Weekly Roundup

Round out your week with these thought-provoking articles from around the internet.

Asian Americans are only half as likely to report psychological distress as Americans overall
Photo by Richard Masoner

Asian Americans are only half as likely to report psychological distress as Americans overall

… In the West, people from Asian cultures have a reputation for stoicism—but is it just a stereotype? A new report from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suggests it isn’t.

Read the rest of the article here.


Running may be better than cycling for long-term bone health
Photo by Damiano Levati

Running may be better than cycling for long-term bone health

… Exercise that puts greater strain on bones, like running, may improve long-term bone health more effectively than non weight-bearing activities like cycling, conclude the authors of a new study measuring the hormones of mountain ultra-marathon runners.

Read the rest of the article here.


Over Time, Buddhism and Science Agree
Photo by Dibyangshu Sarkar

Over Time, Buddhism and Science Agree

… But even decay—an unavoidable consequence of time impacting the real world—isn’t something to regret. As the Vietnamese Buddhist monk and scholar, Thich Nhat Hanh, put it, impermanence (anitya) is intimately tied to continuity. “Look back,” he counsels, “and you will see that you not only exist in your father and mother, but you also exist in your grandparents and in your great grandparents.” Look again, and you will see we “have been gas, sunshine, water, fungi, and plants,” he writes. “Nothing can be born and also nothing can die.” To understand this, and to do so deep in our ever-changing bones, may forever change our sense of time and what it means to participate in life on earth.

Read the rest of the article here.


every exquisite thing
Every Exquisite Thing by Matthew Quick

‘Silver Linings Playbook’ Author Explores Conformity, Mental Health in New Teen Novel

…  “Every Exquisite Thing” is a powerful, dark and engrossing look at conformity and rebellion, reminiscent of “Catcher in the Rye.” But unlike that classic tale, Quick’s book also explores the consequences of non-conformity. It also tackles mental health issues rarely addressed in young adult fiction. Rather than a teen boy, his protagonist is a quirky, introverted and disturbingly self-aware teenage girl.

Read/Listen to the rest of the article here.


chaumetclotilde
photo from Instagram, @chaumetclotilde

How simply moving benefits your mental health

… Movement therapies are often used as adjunctive treatments for depression and anxiety when mental effort, psychotherapy, or medication is not enough. When you are too exhausted to use thought control strategies such as focusing on the positive, or looking at the situation from another angle, movement can come to the rescue.

Read the rest of the article here.

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